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ATTITUDE OF GRATITUDE OVER THE CHRISTMAS PERIOD

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It's Christmas time! That time of year that can be either blissfully happy or incredibly stressful.  It’s also the time of year where we tend to see people be just that little bit kinder and more respectful to others.  If I had my way I would make this ‘Christmas spirit’ continue for 365 days of the year. Not only does it make us feel better but research supports that developing an ‘attitude of gratitude’ can increase happiness, reduce depression and strengthen resiliency.

Researchers such as Bruce Lipton’s have given us an insight into epigenetics, which is the study of changes in organisms caused by the modification of gene expression rather than alteration of the genetic code itself.  Lipton’s research discusses his manipulation of environments that gene cells are in, leading to different outcomes to the SAME gene. Further stating that by simply changing the environment that the gene is in changes the outcome of the gene expression. Leading to the debate that we have more control than we originally thought over our own health and projection in life.  This type of research goes onto discuss the impact on an ‘attitude of gratitude’ on a person's brain.  Giving us proof that grateful people experience reduce blood pressure, less chronic pain, have increased energy levels and even live longer lives. 

There is a whole science now behind gratitude and how repetition and practice can change our beliefs and overall sense of self.  It makes logical sense the better we feel about ourselves and our environment and have higher self-esteem which means we would tend to be more prosocial and thus making us more connected to those around us.  However there is no scientific proof that has been replicated over and over that gratitude actually rewires our brain and produces dopamine and serotonin, these feel-good neurotransmitters activate the happy part (not the official term

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